Month: November 2015

A Lost Industry: Devon marble

Dead Man’s Bay, Dark Ashburton, Fossil Clouded Petitor, Plymouth Black, Pomphlett, Devon Siena, Prince Rock, Little Beltor Pink, Red Ogwell. The names are as diverse as the colours and textures of the stone to which they refer: Devon marble. Not a true marble, it’s quarrying and working was nevertheless an important aspect of the Devon economy throughout the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. (more…)

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Tracing an Occult Language: Beyond the Fell Wall by Richard Skelton

Little Toller continue to push the boundaries of landscape and nature writing with the publication of Beyond the Fell Wall by Richard Skelton. Essentially a long poem divided into thirty-one sections, some in prose, others in blank or concrete verse, it is a small book with grand ambitions. These are apparent from the start, both visually – the front cover features a dynamic linocut by Michael Kirkman, as well as illustrations throughout – and in some of the opening lines: (more…)

Tintagel: On stones and landscapes

Carved stones connect us to landscapes. Through the material, they connect us to a physical one; through the technique of its production and where it is placed, a human one; through the image itself, often a spiritual one. They are points in time and through time that allow us to sense the past and allow the past to leak into the present. Over time, these records of human interaction with the land become more and more precious, documents of moments lived hundreds of years ago. In turn, they, like the medieval churches where they are often found, become part of the landscape themselves, weathering back into it, taking the secrets of the centuries with them. Stone sculpture and landscape are inextricably linked. (more…)